Skincare brand owner SLAMS new Australian laws restricting influencers from promoting sunscreen

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Australian sunscreen brand Samantha Brett owner has blasted new laws that restrict influencers from promoting health and skincare products.

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The Therapeutic Goods Administration’s new advertising code came into effect this month, preventing social media stars from receiving payment for giving testimonials.

Ms Brett, who owns the Naked Sundays sunscreen brand, however believes that SPF products should be exempt from the rules, as it is important to encourage Aussies to protect their skin from the sun.

Australian sunscreen brand Samantha Brett (pictured) owner has blasted new laws that restrict influencers from promoting health and skincare products

Australian sunscreen brand Samantha Brett (pictured) owner has blasted new laws that restrict influencers from promoting health and skincare products

Australian sunscreen brand Samantha Brett (pictured) owner has blasted new laws that restrict influencers from promoting health and skincare products

I do like the fact the TGA is making it mandatory to put warnings and instructions on all advertising, but I think influencers should be allowed to give their opinions about the sunscreens they’re using, whether paid, gifted or unpaid by a brand, Ms Brett told Emerald City on Sunday.

‘How else will a consumer get honest feedback? How else will those who are influenced by social media, particularly Millennials who are most at risk of melanoma, be encouraged to use sunscreen every day? And use it correctly?’ she added.

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Contrary to Ms. Brett’s argument, however, influencers can actually encourage their fans to use sunscreen – just not when it involves receiving money for a product testimonial.

I do like the fact the TGA is making it mandatory to put warnings and instructions on all advertising, but I think influencers should be allowed to give their opinions about the sunscreens they're using, whether paid, gifted or unpaid by a brand, Ms Brett told Emerald City on Sunday

I do like the fact the TGA is making it mandatory to put warnings and instructions on all advertising, but I think influencers should be allowed to give their opinions about the sunscreens they're using, whether paid, gifted or unpaid by a brand, Ms Brett told Emerald City on Sunday

I do like the fact the TGA is making it mandatory to put warnings and instructions on all advertising, but I think influencers should be allowed to give their opinions about the sunscreens they’re using, whether paid, gifted or unpaid by a brand, Ms Brett told Emerald City on Sunday

'How else will a consumer get honest feedback?  How else will those who are influenced by social media, particularly Millennials who are most at risk of melanoma, be encouraged to use sunscreen every day?  And use it correctly?'  she added.  Pictured: Elle Ferguson posing in sponsored ad for Naked Sundays

'How else will a consumer get honest feedback?  How else will those who are influenced by social media, particularly Millennials who are most at risk of melanoma, be encouraged to use sunscreen every day?  And use it correctly?'  she added.  Pictured: Elle Ferguson posing in sponsored ad for Naked Sundays

‘How else will a consumer get honest feedback? How else will those who are influenced by social media, particularly Millennials who are most at risk of melanoma, be encouraged to use sunscreen every day? And use it correctly?’ she added. Pictured: Elle Ferguson posing in sponsored ad for Naked Sundays

‘The measure [of the new rules] is designed to ensure, as much as possible, that testimonials … are genuine and not influenced by commercial interests,’ a TGA spokesperson told Emerald City.

It comes after many Aussie influencers were up in arms over the TGA’s new laws, claiming that they were now unable to make money by selling certain health and skincare products online.

Naked Sundays often uses influencers to promote its products on social media. Pictured promoting products from the brand is Natasha Oakley (left) and Martha Kalifitidis (right)

The new Therapeutic Goods Administration advertising code allows social media stars to give testimonials for products, but only if they don't receive anything in return.  Pictured: Jordan and Zac Stenmark

The new Therapeutic Goods Administration advertising code allows social media stars to give testimonials for products, but only if they don't receive anything in return.  Pictured: Jordan and Zac Stenmark

The new Therapeutic Goods Administration advertising code allows social media stars to give testimonials for products, but only if they don’t receive anything in return. Pictured: Jordan and Zac Stenmark

Yet despite the hysteria, most are still able to earn money from health and beauty brands if they simply avoid offering any personal testimonials.

‘Businesses can continue to engage influencers in their marketing strategies, if the influencer does not provide a personal account of their experience,’ the TGA told Daily Mail Australia.

The simple workaround means influencers can broadly endorse therapeutic goods, as long as they don’t claim to have personally found them effective.

When asked if an influencer could circumvent the rules banning personal endorsements by obtaining a medical qualification in skincare, the TGA said this was not possible.  Pictured: Phoebe Burgess

When asked if an influencer could circumvent the rules banning personal endorsements by obtaining a medical qualification in skincare, the TGA said this was not possible.  Pictured: Phoebe Burgess

When asked if an influencer could circumvent the rules banning personal endorsements by obtaining a medical qualification in skincare, the TGA said this was not possible. Pictured: Phoebe Burgess

The TGA added that 'before and after pictures are also likely to be a testimonial'.  Pictured: Influencer and Bachelorette star Elly Miles

The TGA added that 'before and after pictures are also likely to be a testimonial'.  Pictured: Influencer and Bachelorette star Elly Miles

The TGA added that ‘before and after pictures are also likely to be a testimonial’. Pictured: Influencer and Bachelorette star Elly Miles

The TGA added that ‘before and after pictures are also likely to be a testimonial’.

The changes were made because ‘personal testimonials can be inappropriately persuasive to a vulnerable audience who are seeking products for their health and sometimes very serious health conditions’.

Meanwhile, Bachelor star Laura Byrne has also been vocal in her criticism of sunscreen being included in the list of TGA’s ‘banned’ items.

Bachelor star Laura Byrne (pictured) has also been vocal in her criticism of sunscreen being included in the list of the TGA's 'banned' items.

Bachelor star Laura Byrne (pictured) has also been vocal in her criticism of sunscreen being included in the list of the TGA's 'banned' items.

Bachelor star Laura Byrne (pictured) has also been vocal in her criticism of sunscreen being included in the list of the TGA’s ‘banned’ items.

Weighing in on the debate in February, the mother-of-two wrote to tell fans on Instagram: ‘I’ve seen a lot of conversations happening online around this whole limiting influencers from talking about skincare and proteins and everything else and I agree with it.’

‘The only part of this and the only category I fiercely don’t agree with is sunscreen because I don’t understand why you would stop such a hugely influential population from promoting sunscreen.’

Laura went on to say: ‘I wish someone had told me that when I was in my youth… I just think that that’s a category that makes absolutely no sense to me.’

Weighing in on the debate in February, the mother-of-two wrote told fans on Instagram: 'I've seen a lot of conversations happening online around this whole limiting influencers from talking about skincare and proteins and everything else and I agree with it '

Weighing in on the debate in February, the mother-of-two wrote told fans on Instagram: 'I've seen a lot of conversations happening online around this whole limiting influencers from talking about skincare and proteins and everything else and I agree with it '

Weighing in on the debate in February, the mother-of-two wrote told fans on Instagram: ‘I’ve seen a lot of conversations happening online around this whole limiting influencers from talking about skincare and proteins and everything else and I agree with it ‘

She also explained that she would like her two daughters Marlie Mae, two, and Lola, 11 months to think ‘sunscreen is cool’.

‘I didn’t think it was cool when I was a kid and now I have to get shit burned off me because the whole slip slop slap ads were lame and I didn’t use it,’ she said.

Regulate the manufacture of the sunscreen and the way it can be labeled in Australia better. Don’t regulate the promotion of something that positively impacts the health of everyone.’

Important: She also explained that she would like her two daughters Marlie Mae, two, and Lola, 11 months to think 'sunscreen is cool'

Important: She also explained that she would like her two daughters Marlie Mae, two, and Lola, 11 months to think 'sunscreen is cool'

Important: She also explained that she would like her two daughters Marlie Mae, two, and Lola, 11 months to think ‘sunscreen is cool’

Source: | dailymail.co.uk

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